Tag Archives: portfolio

Found Letter: The Knight of the Night

23 Dec

found-letter1

So apparently some knight left this in my parking lot yesterday and what kind of a friend would I be if I did not share some of the chivalrous swashbuckling of the pen that this man has used to seduce what must be thousands of beautiful maidens? The last time I submitted something to Found Magazine, I don’t think it ever made it public and the world would be done a disservice if that story were replicated. So go on, young knights-in-training, and use this missive as a lesson for how we can all be just a little bit better at attracting the fairer sex. Hell, if you’re lucky, you may even be able to get Sir Schell to mentor you–if he has time to return your letter that is. And for all you ladies: remember, “Fine Bitchs Only 4 Pen Pal,” so don’t even try and front.

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MC Breed – Dead at Age 36

23 Nov

So you know who passed away on November 22? Flint, MI rapper MC Breed died yesterday in his sleep after complications he had been having with his kidneys.  On September 5, Breed collapsed while playing pickup basketball and was hospitalized and placed on life support when his kidneys failed. R.I.P. Breed, and remember, there ain’t no future in your frontin’.

***UPDATE***

So I was watching video again and am I completely stupid that I just now realized the the the video for “Ain’t No Future in Yo’ Frontin'” was shot in Dallas? This makes my initially innocent reference to JFK somehow have more relevance, right?

Need the proof? Around the 1:24 mark, when the lady in the tight black dress is dancing in front of the city, you can clearly make out the dinstinctive keyhole in the Chase Bank Tower. Also, to further the remembrance of those whose service is sadly no longer our privelige, keep a look out around the 2:13 mark, where the gone-but-not-forgotten Good Latimer Tunnel bares it’s tell-tale “1930” marking that can be seen here. I cannot believe that I just noticed this.

Info-Red Kaleidoscope Review

6 Nov

Info Front Cover

Album number two from Info-Red of the Dead Stock Crew and Hypnotic Tunez bumps along with an even more polished version of the witty punchline style that this MC is known for. If you are not familar, Kaleidoscope will surely serve as a thorough introduction to Info-Red’s witty and decisive wordplay. One-liners gallop against some truly solid production work coming from Malex, Rob Viktum, Jezreal the Truth, Darkness, Black Ink Beats, and M Slago. The subject matter keeps things upbeat—we get energetic little rap snacks that, when not making you smile with the smooth punchlines are uplifting with recurring themes of hard work and perseverance. Info’s also careful to point out some of his other obsessions such as sneakers (see: Kixpo). Appearances are plenty, but the album stands heavily on the shoulders of Info and could go on to become an archival release in the grand scheme of the Dallas Hip-Hop scene based on the work he’s done here. We’ll have to see if it stands the test of time. Bavu Blakes stops by for a track, with other appearances from Picnic Tyme, Dawg Wonder, Blaze Won, and the entire Hynotic Tunez crew. Always-on-point DJs Niro and Nemeses provide the turntable work.

Sounds pretty nifty, huh? Well you can catch Info and score your very own copy of Kaleidoscope this Saturday November 8 at the Lounge, that’s down in Deep Ellum at 2810 Elm St. There you’ll also get to see Playdough, Blaze Won, Jabee, Dawg Wonder and Hypnotic Tunez perform—all for free. That is, if you’re old enough to drink. Otherwise bring five bucks.

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The Pitchfork 500

22 Oct

As human beings we use music in myriad cultural contexts–to celebrate, to encourage, to separate, to uplift. But never more than in the past thirty years have these functions evolved so drastically. The way that the craft is processed by culture has undergone a huge change from the days of the album as the epitome of the art form, through the days of the 45, and on to today, where a single mp3 distributed through a social networking venue such as Myspace can cause intense international interest in an act seemingly overnight.

Music aficionados Pitchfork have attempted to capture the essence of these changes with the publication of the upcoming book The Pitchfork 500: Our Guide to the Greatest Songs from Punk to the Present, which traces what they deem the most important songs since the days when the pizzazz of David Bowie, Lou Reed, and Iggy Pop gave kids an alternative to the sweetened pop that the Beatles popularized the previous decade. Employing the cunning writing style that the web site is known for, Pitchfork provides an enlightening view to modern music and its impact on society as a whole. While most readers are sure to immediately recognize many of the hits (Madonna’s “Holiday,” Weezer’s “Say it Ain’t So,” Sinead O’Connor’s “Nothing Compares 2 U”), the guide leaves room for some of the more undercurrent sensations that had more of an effect on future influential performers than they did during their own era.

What is surely one of the first guides to approach music in this way, Pitchfork seeks to enlighten us as it escorts us down memory lane. Set to hit bookstores on 11/11/08, The Pitchfork 500 may just be the template that future music historians refer to when assessing the value that the power of the singular song has played in the collective conscious of the 21st century and beyond.  Pre-order here. Selected highlights after the jump:

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Dandy Don Meredith Honored by SMU — Jersey No. 17 Retired At Last

8 Oct

In the first three decades of the existence of the Dallas Cowboys–perhaps the greatest sports organization on the planet–only nine players and the revered head coach Tom Landry were inducted into the Ring of Honor at Texas Stadium. Only the words “Bob Lilly” and its accompanying “74” have been there longer than the name of Don Meredith, beaming upon legions of Cowboy fans from its blue stripe just beneath the press box. And Dandy Don deserved 1,000% to be up there because of his importance to North Texas.

He grew up a 100 mile drive down I-30 in a small town called Mount Vernon and played his way to number one recruit status. He turned down a scholarship offer from Bear Bryant at Texas A&M in favor of Dallas’ SMU, where he founded the university’s Fellowship of Christian Athletes chapter. He finished third in Heisman voting in 1958. Then he went on to become the only kid from a Dallas high school or college to come start for America’s Team. They slapped his name up on that Ring of Honor in 1976. That’s Twenty-Two years ago for those keeping score.

So can anyone tell me why the ample brain trust that is the SMU Hall of Fame Committee has just now decided to retire Meredith’s hallowed number 17? It’s been a long time coming, but you’d think that someone would have noticed considering that SMU and the Cowboys shared the same field as tenants of the Cotton Bowl. The committee consists mainly of members of the Letterman’s Club, but unfortunately I couldn’t find any info on this organization on SMU’s interwebs. My guess is that they don’t want to be reached, considering the tardiness of this decision and the fact that they are the same people behind this.

Tony Bones Interview

8 Aug

Dallas and New York  based artist Tony Bones has made about as many enemies as he had fans with his years of prominent graffiti. Many have entered the debate as to whether his work actually qualifies as art. Tony’s luck has caught up with him in his home town, though and now he is forced to face the ugly consequences of his illegal activities. Fortunately for the artist, enough of an audience exists that a transition to galleries has become his main focus. The N. Period had the chance to sit down with Tony Bones recently at The Public Trust in Deep Ellum, where he has an upcoming solo show.

N.: What was yr first experience with graphic art/design?

Tony Bones:  I got started really I guess doing doodles.  On school papers, on my school tests, like in the margins and stuff.  Then it moved on to my desk, and then I started writing in the bathrooms at school — it just went everywhere from there. All city, all over the place. It was an evolution, then it consumed me, the whole graffiti thing.

N.: I know that you are from East Dallas, which is one of the most culturally diverse parts of the city.  When you were growing up, did you know how great of a neighborhood that you were in?

TB: I didn’t really have anything to put it against, but I definitely had an appreciation for it.  East Dallas has more of a neighborhood feel, kinda like an old flavor, more of a sense of community, I’ve always had a lot of love for the East side.

N.: Who were your influences once you got into graffiti?

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New SMU Football Uniforms: A Blue Critique

10 Jul

With the announcement last week that the SMU football team would be sporting “new” uniforms, I felt the need to bring up the Mustangs’ schizophrenic handling of the color blue.  Now I’m not old enough to remember, but I can’t recall ever seeing the SMU athletic teams wearing anything but royal before the mid to late 1990s. But navy was the preferred hue of blue that the football team adopted in 2003. And there seems to be no explanation for this at all.  For a school with as rich an atheltic heritage in the city of Dallas as SMU, it is a sad tale how much apathy has surrounded its programs since the NCAA dropped the Death Penalty on them in 1987.

Look at the school’s official colors and you’ll see that they are “Harvard Red and Yale Blue.” WHY?  That automatically dooms the Mustangs to aspire to be a copy of another school, AT BEST!  I’m sure schools with such strong ties to their colors as the University of Texas look at SMU and just laugh.  Who can tell me where the non-official usage of navy came from?

Its not just the football team, either.  In recent years the soccer teams, basketball teams, and even the cheerleaders have been seen clad in navy. Let’s hope with the introduction of these new football duds, which hearken back to the Pony Express days of Eric Dickerson and Craig James, we are now seeing the abandonment of navy, which is not even a sanctioned school color.  Oh, and by the way, with the new June Jones-era unis the school has introduced are in a shade called “SMU Blue.”

Looks like hoops are back in royal now, though.

Why oh why SMU do you play fast and loose with your colors?  What other sports team, at any level, does this?  Southern Methodist University — pick one color and stick with it. Please.  Maybe you’ll see that people care about your teams when they think that you actually do.

What do you think? Please tell me what you think in the comments.

Thanks to hombre de steel for the vintage banner photos.

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